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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2013 1:00am EDT
of the house and a grand lady from louisiana, ms. lindy boggs. they was a pioneer and trail blazer for the state of louisiana. she served louisiana's second congressional district following the death of her husband, h lambings e boggs. she was the first woman to represent the state of louisiana in congress and founder of the congresswoman's caucus. mr. scalise: in tribute to her service as a pioneer for women, the congressional women's reading room is rightfully named in her honor down the hall. she was the first woman and only louisiana ambassador to the holy see in the tenure of pope john paul ii. lindy effortlessly balanced her role as a respected leader and loving mother. she loved her city of new orleans, in fact, lived on bourbon street for many of her later years in new orleans. she loved her beloved tulane university and in fact, just recently, she and her daughter cokie participated in a benefit for tulane university in new orleans. she's somebody who will be dearly missed and somebody who we are honored to have, to be able to call a former colleague of ours here in the ho
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 9:00pm EDT
was president and it was right before monroe left to go to france to negotiate what became the louisiana purchase. he wrote, monroe has a fine feeling. he cannot stand to be from his wife, so he is taking her with him. that was pretty much their attitude. he was devoted to family, as well. that is really what they wanted to do. if they had their choice of how they would spend their time, it would be with their family. >> this program is interactive. we invite your phone calls. you can reach us at -- let me turn to a facebook poster. "we have heard elizabeth monroe did not like being first lady." >> she did not like the public parts of it. she married james monroe when she was a member of the continental congress. through their entire adult life, he was in one public office or the other. she was very much used to him being a public figure, being the governor of virginia, being abroad as a minister of the united states serving as secretary of state. to go to the white house was not anything that unusual. it was not anything unexpected. people had talked about monroe being president for yea
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 9:00pm EDT
for president at the time, gets the vice presidential nomination so you have this axis of taylor, a louisiana sugar planter, running with fillmore, the comptroller of the state of new york. for me there's a personal thing which i have to say, i currently teach at albany law school where fillmore was living and next year i will be a visitor at l.s.u., a law school in louisiana, so i'm the embodiment of the albany-baton rouge accent, as well. >> i'd like to say, let's don't discount that the mexican war brought us all of the western southwest -- california, new mexico, et cetera. he was the commander-in-chief and he acted like it and if it upset winfield scott who had quite a temper, and zachary taylor, so be it, but as it turned out, that's what history has recorded. we greatly expanded the united states during that time and we got those properties for very, very little. in terms of the history of real estate, polk rates high. >> on to zachary taylor. >> only if you think that going to war with a country to steal half their country is an appropriate and legitimate thing to do and significant n
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
, first of all, made possible the louisiana purchase because that poll began was -- thatnapoleon was done with the empire as a result of the humiliating defeat. secondly, after haiti, after that revolution, the north atlantic slave trade was ended by britain and the united. and the last sort of breadth of that was the end of the civil war. one of the great story of history. >> host: this month on booktv in-depth program author and activist randall robinson. he's the author of five non-fiction books. here they are. what is transafrica? >> guest: transafrica is or the organization that i began in 1976 to galvanize african-american opinion on foreign policy issues. particularly issues that concern the black world. u.s. policy africa, the caribbean, and latin america. so transafrica, of course, of the organization that used instrumentality to galvanize american opposition to apartheid . for the set of sanctions that president reagan vetoed was overridden by republican controlled senate because of the work we did and the millions we organized to make a difference. that coupled with the great w
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2013 1:00am EDT
care act. the last thing i tell you is if i ever leave, i have been in tech, florida, louisiana, georgia, virginia, i can go on theon, if i ever lead with affordable care act, individuals are often confused about what i am saying. if i lead with something like this, if you have had a pre- existing condition and you cannot get insurance or it is $1500 a month and you cannot afford it, on january 1, that does not exist anymore and here is why. if your child is covered to age 26 and you are happy about it, and you do not understand why, here is why. >> that is the only group that does benefit our people who did not have and could not get coverage before it. that one percent of the population does benefit is -- if the coverage is available. >> it is more than one percent. >> the gentleman's time has expired. at this time, i recognize the gentleman from michigan, mr. dingell, for five minutes. >> i thank you for your courtesy. i thank you for holding this hearing. thank you, madam administrator, for being here today. we are 60 days away from the open enrollment. october 1. we are at
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 1:00am EDT
a retirement on capitol hill. there is a headline from a louisiana newspaper. representative alexander won't run for re-election. meeting might decide fate of obama-putin visit. secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary will meet with their counterparts on friday in washington to talk about a number of issues. they say at the top of the list are difficult questions that are sure to be the status of the meeting between mr. obama and mr. putin, which has been in doubt for weeks because of issues that include russia's refusal to return edward snowden united states to face charges of leaking national security secrets. that is a reporter from the new york times. a reporter from the washington post pokes fun. there is an editorial cartoon. putin is saying to edward snowden, here is a whistle you can blow whenever you see a gay person. there are stricter laws against homosexual people in russia. jonathan stray has written extensively about the issue of nsa surveillance for pro- publica. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> you might have been listening in. we have had a couple
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 1:00am EDT
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 9:00pm EDT
the streets of california and the las vegas trip, from the streets of soma, the fields of georgia, louisiana. one man is now a united states senator representing the state of maine. he was in the march. he had a good seat to watch the speech of dr. king. he was in a branch of a tree in the mall watching the speech. people came from all over. these crowd people and these proud african americans and their allies would no longer stand silent while the promise of liberty and justice for all denied freedom to so many. i could not hear the speeches. i felt the heat. i was inside the capital. but i could see the tide of history turn as hundreds of thousands of our brothers and sisters pushed forward toward that thing called freedom. that day, martin luther king shared his dream. they consider 1963 not as the end of the fight of civil rights, but only the beginning. here is what he said. "we cannot turn back. there are those who are acting asking for the civil rights, when will we be satisfied? we are not satisfied and we will not be until justice rolls down like a mighty stream." in the year follow
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 12:00pm EDT
, it's massachusetts. it's louisiana which is sort of unique in some ways. we'd all have a debate about whether it's good or bad, what's happening in louisiana. and that doesn't bring, the small school thing is in that mix. it's nested in that mix. what does a school day well? what would be better to farm out to a larger entity. you don't have a lot of that farming out in a lot of state digital have so much in california. you don't have so much in new jersey that superintendent sharing program is interesting, and hopefully someone will study that. but i think that's where you would want to move. are the things that a small school can do well, and then how large do the other entities have to get to take on certain tasks in order to be effective? >> again, i think your paper and the position that 105s doesn't fit all is right thing to take. interdistrict may work in some places, but then there has to be real choice if it's going to be the case but it has to be about quality and has to be about kids as opposed to the politics that we see floating around choice now. and the places that we w
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 6:00am EDT
to turn now to as prats who's the director of emergency preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals. that puts her smack in the middle of coordinating among federal, state and local agencies that are dealing with and preparing for that disaster this type. she has a rich and various background and health administration roles. she was around during the katrina days and has been around the department more than 20 years. we are really pleased to have you with us today. >> be sure i've got this right. can you hear me? all right. well good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. so i thought i would talk to you from what i know in terms of my strength is more in obligations. usually i never had a loss for words. from an operations perspective if you told me, you know, that the problem is katrina, rita, gustav, ike, the oil spill. they're some of the operation concerns we have. if you said okay how are we going to evacuate have the coast line and a 32 hour period i know who to go to and how long it's going
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 12:00pm EDT
to take over black cities in louisiana doing the same thing in michigan. we will not have the kind of turnout we've had in previous years unless we take your -- make sure we add emergency managers and the suppressions. to the list of voter suppression. >> i would like to -- >> jo ann watson. >> yes, sir? >> counselwoman from detroit. give her a round of applause. we have to challenge the constitutionality of the emergency manager law, which suspends every elected official from voting. as he said himself, he's a benevolent dictator. [inaudible] right. we need to organize at the national level, because what is happening in michigan can happen -- >> emergency management. [inaudible] >> department of justice, i think, moving with us but they haven't acted on it yet. sorry to say. >> congressman john? >> we have similar things taking place in georgia in the dekalb county. the school board has been removed by the governor. he's replaced them with his own pick. and these kinds of moves have been sanctioned by the voters. so when they put constitutional amendments on the ballot, and they t
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 8:00am EDT
. >> thank you for this opportunity. my name is thomas and i'm from baton rouge, louisiana. you know, and i'm sitting here and i'm taking in a lot of the discussion. of course, i'm not necessarily as young as i look, but i've been around the pool of law. in fact, for a number of years we dealt with civil rights litigation in the state of louisiana, and as i sit here and look at the audience, and we're talking about what can we do today, the first thing we need to do is get young people here. you know, most of us who are sitting in this room are old enough to recognize what transpired. and we talk about social media and how do we get young people involved. we can't do anything, congressman lewis, if we don't have young people here at the table. let me tell you why. those of you who are not familiar to many of the laws that we have put in place today have actually boxed us in, as a community. you see right now, if you notice the election of congressman throughout the country, it happened because we created this multimember districts. a lot of which we can't change today, because we don't have
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 7:00am EDT
to negotiate with a guy named napoleon bonaparte. he negotiated the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize because he mediated the russo japanese war in 1905. fdr's wartime diplomacy secured and allies for churchill, stalin. that was political to overcoming the power to president kennedy turned the diplomacy when the great majority of his advisers in october 1952 said use force. at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy, the soviet premier make you tricshelle, that's how the cuban missile crisis ended. that's why we didn't and centric hundreds of millions of people on the east coast, the midwest of united states and in europe, and in russia. because diplomacy rather than force triumphs. think of henry kissinger, still going strong at age 90 by the way, 40 years ago negotiate his brilliant opening to china that open up relations that have been frozen for the last 20 years prior, and insured a generation of peace between china and t
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 6:00am EDT
and our disaster resilience series which cohosted with the pennington foundation of baton rouge, louisiana. for those of you interested in the series i would encourage you to visit our website, csis.org to learn more about those events including interviews and videos. natural disasters represent a significant challenge. on average we experience 10 severe weather events each year, exceeding $1 billion in damage. in the 1980s the annual average was only two such even events. in 2012 alone disastrous cost the u.s. an estimated $110 billion making it the second most costly year in disasters in recent decades. adjusting disasters and the cost goes will acquire us to -- our long-term efforts to build resilience for communities, businesses, government agencies and individuals are better prepared for and can recover more quickly and more fully from natural disasters. to discuss how we can make building and resilient nation more effective and more of a priority, we're joined today by dissing bush panel of experts. first i would like to introduce david heyman who'll be living a few opening remarks.
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 12:00pm EDT
to rosanne prats, the director of emergency preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals that puts it smack in the middle of coordinating among federal, state and local agencies that are dealing with and preparing for the disasters. she has a background in health administration rules and was around during the katrina days in louisiana and has been with the department for more than 20 years. we are pleased to have you with us today. >> make sure i've got this right. >> can you hear me? all right good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. usually i never had a loss for words. from the operations perspective if you told me, you know, that the problem is katrina, read the, gustav, ike, the mississippi oil spill, recently tropical storm isaac. some of the concerns we have is how can we evacuate have the coast line in a 38 hour period i know who to go to and how long it is going to take. how many will be evacuated or not, how many can help themselves, how many will be the state's assistance, how many of those will n
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 8:00am EDT
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 11:00pm EDT
's a shocking story. there two people in louisiana just in jail for months and months sort of languishing simply forgotten about. i found shocking. >> guest: yeah. it's shocking. what is interesting about new orleans and the situation in louisiana and why i choose to write about that was that their budget crisis. it's something being experienced across the country in the last five years, but with shrinking budgets, you know, one of the places that on the chopping block fairly early in the process is public defenders office. so in new orleans, what happened was the public defender the chief public defender was forced to lay off a third of lawyers. one whole division, which is called the conflicts division, and con flingts means if there's two people arrested for say robbing a seven eleven. one gets public defenders' office. because they might be accusing each other, being the one who fired the gun or whatever. you need a separate lawyer. and so in new orleans, they had a conflicts division. it was a separate division. they completely got rid of that in the budget cuts. so anybody then that came i
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 11:00pm EDT
the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize to kasim mediated to russo-japanese war in 1905. fdr's wartime to pomc sera carried an alliance with churchill in stalin. president kennedy turned the diplomacy to win the great majority of his advisers and october 1962 saying use force at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy the soviet premier nikita khrushchev and that is how the cuban missile crisis ended and that is why we didn't incinerate hundreds of millions of people on the east coast in the midwest united states and in europe and russia because diplomacy rather than force triumphed. think of henry kissinger still going strong at age 90 by the way, 40 years ago negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relations that have been frozen for the last 20 years prior and ensured a generation of peace between china and the united states rethink the president george h.w. bush, wash 41. a lot of people think he was
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 11:00pm EDT
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 11:00pm EDT
of louisiana is cut away. you cannot get there in more. and so all those supplies, the food, the manpower coming from the mississippi to the confederacy coming east stops. does not happen anymore. union controls the river. the other thing is the expert is of real hope. the growth coming from the east stopped at the river. things would come back for. that stopped because now the union army controls the railroad . they cut it on. you cannot underestimate the power of rage and real rooms during the civil war. it'd have trucks. it was reason gallons. the union army by capturing expert stops all that from that whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wind up for the union army to use, the union need be used to transport material, man, food, equipment, whatever they needed to the south. it very definitely is the beginning of the end for the confederacy. a lot of people in the confederacy know this. there are "the book to that effect, but that is the history lesson. you have people like john pemberton. he is not a favorite sun. in fact, he's not a sign at
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 11:00pm EDT
the 1990s. i happened to be teaching in louisiana at the time, and david duke, anybody remember him? nearly became governor of the state, and my daughter was six months old, and i decided to get active in the community to stop the kkk/nazis from taking over the state i was living in. i became active then with the national organization for women because the commit to the sexism, racism, home phobia, racism, all the isms, connect the dots. they are intertwined, cannot be pulled apart. i've. talking to -- we have been talking to colleagues in the weeks and days leading up to this very lunchon, and one of the things we talked about is the four themes of the 50th anniversary march on washington, and that would be freedom and jobs and peace and social justice. when you look at those issues and ask yourself, gosh, what is the impact on women of those things, and then you ask you're, huh, what is the impact on various communities of women, what is the impact on african-american women; what is the impact on immigrant women, latinas; what about younger women; what about older women? if we ask the que
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)